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  • InterContinental Hong Kong, 18 Salisbury Rd., Tsim Sha Tsui (tel. 800/327-0200 in the U.S., or 852/2721 1211): No hotel lobby boasts a better view of Victoria Harbour and Hong Kong Island than the light-infused lobby of this standout property, right at water's edge in Tsim Sha Tsui. State-of-the-art rooms (most with harbor views), a spa renowned for its anti-jet lag and healing treatments, restaurants that are as fun as they are excellent, and free tai chi and yoga classes make this one of the city's top choices.
  • The Peninsula Hong Kong, Salisbury Road, Tsim Sha Tsui (tel. 866/382-8388 in the U.S., or 852/2920 2888): The grand old dame of Hong Kong, this historic hotel, built in 1928, exudes elegance and colonial splendor, with one of the most famous, ornate lobbies in town -- a must for afternoon tea. A tower with a top-floor restaurant designed by Philippe Starck, a state-of-the-art spa, classes ranging from cooking to tai chi, Hong Kong's most venerable restaurants, and outstanding service assure this historic hotel a top rating despite newer and more glamorous competitors.
  • Island Shangri-La Hong Kong, Pacific Place, Central (tel. 866/565-5050 in the U.S., or 852/2877 3838): There's no mistaking you're anywhere but Asia in Hong Kong Island's tallest hotel, adorned with lush Tai Ping carpets, artistic flower arrangements, and more than 500 paintings, including the world's largest Chinese landscape painting. Spacious rooms combine Asian touches (like Chinese lacquerware TV cabinets) with up-to-date technology (like LCD TVs and DVD players), but the top-floor French restaurant opts for old-world charm as it wows with one of the best dining views in Hong Kong.
  • Mandarin Oriental, Hong Kong, 5 Connaught Rd., Central (tel. 800/526-6566 in the U.S., or 852/2522 0111): This is one of Hong Kong's oldest yet newest hotels, first opened in 1963 but recently renovated from top to bottom. Travelers returning for repeat stays will find familiarity in the Captain's Bar, the Chinnery, Clipper's Lounge, and Mandarin Grill, all back by popular demand, but new are the spa with a 1930s Shanghai ambience, restaurants serving French and international cuisine, and luxuriously remodeled rooms with great sitting rooms where the balconies used to be.

Note: This information was accurate when it was published, but can change without notice. Please be sure to confirm all rates and details directly with the companies in question before planning your trip.