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The guy who basically invented the notion that Las Vegas could become a luxury destination for discerning guests? Steve Wynn. He’s credited with opening the Mirage and Bellagio and transforming Las Vegas into the high-service capital we know it as today. That’s the guy whose name is up on top of the hotel. He even signed the thing to let you know it’s his.

His eponymous hotel and sister property Encore (because he did it again . . . duh) are the epitome of modern luxury. Breathe in the lovely (quite possibly pumped in, but we don’t care) floral scent as you walk through the doors, and appreciate the lush red, gold, and green that accents the decor; it’s like walking through one big manufactured, Wynn-branded garden. These resorts are also humongous. No matter if you walk into Wynn or Encore, it’s a winding road through and around the casino floor, wherever you need to go. But there’s so much to visually take in, you won’t mind the trek.

The Wynn Tower features the hotel’s standard rooms, but they’re far from ordinary. Floor-to-ceiling windows let in lots of light, and, with a nice touch of feng shui, the beds face the windows, so you can wake up to a gorgeous view of the mountains or golf course. In fact, you won’t even have to get out of the ultra-plush bed to open the curtains in the morning. With a touch of a button on the panel on the bedside table, you can cast them open and say “Hello, Las Vegas!” Rooms are awash in creamy tones, and the gorgeously appointed bathrooms are encased in plenty of marble, including the oversize bathtub next to the gloriously powerful shower. Soak it up, this is as glamorous as it gets.

Wynn Tower Suites offer slightly larger accommodations, but also have the benefit of a private entrance for check-in. It’s a higher price point, but the rate includes breakfast for two daily at the hoity-toity Tableau, and they also kick in access to the Tower Suites’ own pool.

The rooms of younger sister Encore next door are comparatively elegant and luxurious, following the same calming aesthetic, but with a few subtle, chic differences. Encore is all suites, with separate sitting and sleeping areas divided by a half wall. The black upholstery also makes the rooms seem far more contemporary. The pillow top Wynn Dream Bed lives up to its name (I had one of most restful sleeps I’ve ever had on the Strip on one). Bathrooms are downright palatial, with a giant tub next to the glass-enclosed shower, dual sinks and a 13-inch flatscreen TV, because feeling like you’re rich means having a TV in your bathroom.

The Moroccan hammam that is Encore’s spa is one of the most opulent on the Strip. The ornate mosaic tile in the lobby alone had me so entranced that it felt like the massage treatment was simply a nice bonus.

“Daylife” is a major component to Wynn and Encore, centered around three different pool areas, plus the clandestine digs of the Tower Suites pool. The Wynn and Encore pools are both calm and low-key, each with multiple bodies of water, Jacuzzis, and cabanas. The Encore European pool allows for topless sunbathing. Encore Beach Club, however, is another animal entirely: a daytime party on the weekends for guests more concerned with the live DJ than they are with their tans.

Eating at both these hotels will run up a bill, but high-end culinary options such as Costa di Mare, Sinatra, Botero, and Wing Lei, are totally worth the splurge.